BAC Level Readings based on Bottles of Beer Consumed

BAC Level Readings based on Bottles of Beer Consumed

Americans love to drink and drive – this is embedded in the nation’s culture. Proof and the reason behind this is shown by Barron H. Lerner, MD, PhD in his book, titled, “One for the Road.” This is the reason why many Americans still drive while under the influence, despite the risk of a DUI or DWI charge that is punished by heavy fines and imprisonment.

Driving under the influence (DUI) or driving while intoxicated (DWI), however, is a serious traffic offense, whether the charge is a misdemeanor (for first time offenders and without causing any property damage or physical injury) or a felony (imputed on repeat offenders, or first time offenders whose blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level is way above the 0.08% limit, for those with a child passenger or who injures/kills someone in an accident) .

Based on a blood alcohol concentration measurement chart released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the following number of beer bottles would result to the following BAC level (This measurement caters to a 160-pound man who would consume the indicated number of bottles of beer within one hour. Since individuals have different tolerance levels to alcohol, however, there are those who would already experience slower reflexes even after just two bottles):

  • 2 bottles of beer = 0.02% BAC
  • 3 bottles of beer = 0.05% BAC
  • 4 bottles of beer = 0.08% BAC – the BAC limit in all US states
  • 5 bottles of beer = 0.10% BAC
  • 7 bottles of beer = 0.15% BAC

Based on CDC records, more than 1.4 million drivers were arrested in 2010 due to driving under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs; the number of deaths due to alcohol- impairment was 10,322 in 2012 and 10,076 in 2013.

For many Americans, a few bottles of beer with friends or colleagues or a shot of 80-proof liquor (vodka, gin, whiskey, rum), especially during weekends or holidays would definitely not hurt; rightly so, but only if they do not drive afterwards.

It is true that majority of those who are charged with DUI are first offenders who never even suppose that the amount of alcohol they consume will impair their driving ability and lead them into an accident that may injure someone and damage properties.

According to a West Columbia DUI attorney, however, “A DWI/DUI can be deemed a felony-level crime for many reasons, especially in South Carolina. If anyone is seriously injured due to the accident, it is almost automatically considered a felony. Any child passenger involved in a drunk driving accident also greatly increases the likelihood of being charged with a felony DUI. Furthermore, a third DUI offense is automatically deemed a felony-level crime. A felony elevates the range of punishments for a crime, so establishing a strong defense to preserve your freedom becomes all the more important.

The courts already do not take DUI cases lightly, and when a child is involved, the stakes are drastically increased. All drunk driving cases involving children are subject to additional fines and jail time, and these additional penalties are mandatory if convicted for the original offense. Even if you are not convicted of the DUI, a mandatory 60-day license suspension might be imposed. In some states, a child is said to be anyone who is under the age of 16. An attorney may be able to help you reduce or completely avoid these additional DUI penalties.”

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